Rick Astley

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Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sat Mar 23, 2013 10:12 am


Voice type: Baritone
Vocal range: E♭2-C5

Significant high notes:
C5 ("Hopelessly")
B♭4 ("She Wants To Dance With Me")
A4 ("Cry For Help", "Giving Up on Love")
G♯4 ("Never Gonna Give You Up", "Hold Me In Your Arms", "Whenever You Need Somebody", "Lights Out")
G4 ("Take Me To Your Heart", "Hopelessly")

Significant low notes:
B♭2 ("She Wants To Dance With Me")
G♯2 ("When I Fall in Love")
G2 ("Where Do I Begin", "Nature Boy")
E♭2 ("White Christmas" live)

Original thread by Timmerbo

.......................................................
*Orange marks notes with questionable registers: absolutely no use figuring out these.
*Blue marks probable non-modal notes.
*Red marks extremely bad, unimpressive or unintentional notes.
*Italics mark non-sung notes.


Last edited by Sippe on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:54 am; edited 3 times in total
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Maverick31 on Sat Mar 23, 2013 10:39 am

Awesome!
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  bradphone on Sat Mar 23, 2013 10:41 am


1:55 a Falsetto C5!!!


(I would classify him as a SB btw)
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Pepe Forever on Sat Mar 23, 2013 12:00 pm

bradphone wrote:(I would classify him as a SB btw)
SB
S

And by that you mean High Baritone, right? Tiphat
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  bradphone on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:20 am

pepeforever wrote:
bradphone wrote:(I would classify him as a SB btw)
SB
S

And by that you mean High Baritone, right? Tiphat

Yes. Sorry i was a bit confused with the LT/ST/HT thing. So i thought the same thing counted for Baritones.. but indeed High Baritone is the good vocal type for him (IMO)
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:26 am

If he's a Baritone, shouldn't his range go down to like at least E4 in highs
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:37 am

Tenor45 wrote:If he's a Baritone, shouldn't his range go down to like at least E4 in highs
That sounds reasonable, let's add notes down to E4 for Mike Patton while we're at it.
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:38 am

bradphone wrote:it confused with the LT/ST/HT thing. So i thought the same thing counted for Baritones..
What do you mean? They're the same.

Low tenor, mid/standard tenor and high tenor.
Low baritone, mid/standard baritone and high baritone.
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:39 am

Sippe wrote:
Tenor45 wrote:If he's a Baritone, shouldn't his range go down to like at least E4 in highs
That sounds reasonable, let's add notes down to E4 for Mike Patton while we're at it.

I'm speaking of his tessitura in this case which seems to be relativey low, adding notes lower would make the thread look more presentable
Mike Patton's range goe s well into the 7th octave so his tessitura is higher
Rick Astleys is still in the 4th octave so adding lower notes seems to be an option
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:44 am

Tenor45 wrote:
I'm speaking of his tessitura in this case which seems to be relativey low, adding notes lower would make the thread look more presentable
That first part makes no sense whatsoever.

But you haven't considered the possibility that the lack of notes is because no one has notewatched him? I can't exactly add notes if I don't have any to add.(gonna add the notes brad mentioned yesterday though)
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:46 am

Sippe wrote:

But you haven't considered the possibility that the lack of notes is because no one has notewatched him? I can't exactly add notes if I don't have any to add.(gonna add the notes brad mentioned yesterday though)

You mean the note
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:48 am

Tenor45 wrote:
Sippe wrote:

But you haven't considered the possibility that the lack of notes is because no one has notewatched him? I can't exactly add notes if I don't have any to add.(gonna add the notes brad mentioned yesterday though)

You mean the note
No, I don't.
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:48 am

Sippe wrote:
Tenor45 wrote:
Sippe wrote:

But you haven't considered the possibility that the lack of notes is because no one has notewatched him? I can't exactly add notes if I don't have any to add.(gonna add the notes brad mentioned yesterday though)

You mean the note
No, I don't.
ok
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:58 am

Tenor45 wrote:
Mike Patton's range goe s well into the 7th octave so his tessitura is higher
Rick Astleys is still in the 4th octave so adding lower notes seems to be an option
That's exactly my point. Saying that we should add lower notes because someone is a baritone is completely illogical, since a baritone can still have really high notes.

At the same time I've notewatched tenors who don't go above A4, so E4 would be a fair note to start at in that case.

Hence why I mentioned Patton when you said a baritone should have E4s in the thread...I swear this forum gets more stupid for every day that passes.
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 1:04 am

Sippe wrote:
Tenor45 wrote:
Mike Patton's range goe s well into the 7th octave so his tessitura is higher
Rick Astleys is still in the 4th octave so adding lower notes seems to be an option
That's exactly my point. Saying that we should add lower notes because someone is a baritone is completely illogical, since a baritone can still have really high notes.

At the same time I've notewatched tenors who don't go above A4, so E4 would be a fair note to start at in that case.

Hence why I mentioned Patton when you said a baritone should have E4s in the thread...I swear this forum gets more stupid for every day that passes.

That's what I was trying to say, This is the range place not the VT place
I agree if a singer doesn't go past a certain range than starting the highs from a lower note seems ok to me
also I mentioned the E4s as a good starting point because His range (Which I now know you are still notewatching so fair enough) is fairly low
That's all I was saying

If you like I can notewatch him a later, I have a greatest hits album from himthat I could watch
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 1:09 am

Tenor45 wrote:
That's what I was trying to say, This is the range place not the VT place
I agree if a singer doesn't go past a certain range than starting the highs from a lower note seems ok to me
also I mentioned the E4s as a good starting point because His range (Which I now know you are still notewatching so fair enough) is fairly low
That's all I was saying

If you like I can notewatch him a later, I have a greatest hits album from himthat I could watch
Then I suggest you leave out his voice type next time, since it has nothing to do with which notes are significant.

and wtf is VT?
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Sun Mar 24, 2013 1:16 am

Sippe wrote:
Tenor45 wrote:
That's what I was trying to say, This is the range place not the VT place
I agree if a singer doesn't go past a certain range than starting the highs from a lower note seems ok to me
also I mentioned the E4s as a good starting point because His range (Which I now know you are still notewatching so fair enough) is fairly low
That's all I was saying

If you like I can notewatch him a later, I have a greatest hits album from himthat I could watch
Then I suggest you leave out his voice type next time, since it has nothing to do with which notes are significant.

and wtf is VT?


VT=voice type
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  AquaGuy on Sun Mar 24, 2013 1:17 am

What does notewatching mean? I have heard the term before but don't understand it.


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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Monocus on Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:25 am

The term is believed to go back to the initial exploration of Mesoamerica - particularly the Yucatán Peninsula - by the Spanish "Conquistadors" from the 15th century to the early 16th century.
During those early expeditions they'd often come across so called "cenotes", a sort of pit/cave filled with groundwater exposed by a hole in the ground (see Wikipedia for details and pictures).
Overambitious adventurers would often overlook the sometimes well-covered holes - and die falling into them.
Urging the conquistadors to caution, the Spanish explorers were told to "watch out for cenotes" (or the Spanish equivalent of it).
Under the influence of British adventurers during the transatlantic triangular trade, that term developed into "notewatching" or "note-watching".
The term remains frequently used today, although usually in a metaphorical way, as it is on our forums.

We on The Range Place generally use the term as a pun.
I alludes to the activity of listening to a singer's output, "watching for (significant) notes".
Discussing those findings is known to potentially cause furious rants and otherwise critical situations, often seriously hurting people's feelings.
We have lost many keen explorers that way.
The double meaning hence - in a rather cynical way - urges not to fall in to the metaphorical pit of hurting yourself or others.


Last edited by Monocus on Sun Mar 24, 2013 9:33 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Buh-Red on Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:43 am

Monocus wrote:The term is believed to go back to the initial exploration of Meso-America - particularly the Yucatán Peninsula - by the Spanish "Conquistadors" from the 15th century to the early 16th century.
During those early expeditions they'd often come across so called "cenotes", a sort of pit/cave filled with groundwater, exposed by a hole in the ground (see Wikipedia for details and pictures).
Over-ambitious adventurers would often overlook the sometimes well-covered holes - and die falling into them.
Urging the conquistadors to caution, the Spanish explorers were told to "watch out for cenotes" (or the Spanish equivalent of it).
Under the influence of British adventurers during the transatlantic triangular trade, that term developed into "notewatching" or "note-watching".
The term remains frequently used today, although usually in a metaphorical way, as it is on our forums.

We on The Range Place generally use the term as a pun alluding to listening to a singer's output and "watch for (significant) notes" and determining their pitches.
Discussing those findings is known to potentially cause furious rants and otherwise critical situations, often seriously hurting people's feelings.
We have lost many keen explorers that way.
The double meaning hence urges not to fall in to the metaphorical pit of hurting yourself or others, although in a rather cynical way.

I'd like to nominate this for best post

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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Hopscotch on Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:51 pm

Monocus wrote:The term is believed to go back to the initial exploration of Mesoamerica - particularly the Yucatán Peninsula - by the Spanish "Conquistadors" from the 15th century to the early 16th century.
During those early expeditions they'd often come across so called "cenotes", a sort of pit/cave filled with groundwater exposed by a hole in the ground (see Wikipedia for details and pictures).
Overambitious adventurers would often overlook the sometimes well-covered holes - and die falling into them.
Urging the conquistadors to caution, the Spanish explorers were told to "watch out for cenotes" (or the Spanish equivalent of it).
Under the influence of British adventurers during the transatlantic triangular trade, that term developed into "notewatching" or "note-watching".
The term remains frequently used today, although usually in a metaphorical way, as it is on our forums.

We on The Range Place generally use the term as a pun.
I alludes to the activity of listening to a singer's output, "watching for (significant) notes".
Discussing those findings is known to potentially cause furious rants and otherwise critical situations, often seriously hurting people's feelings.
We have lost many keen explorers that way.
The double meaning hence - in a rather cynical way - urges not to fall in to the metaphorical pit of hurting yourself or others.
Clap
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Crimsonfripp on Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:38 pm

Monocus wrote:The term is believed to go back to the initial exploration of Mesoamerica - particularly the Yucatán Peninsula - by the Spanish "Conquistadors" from the 15th century to the early 16th century.
During those early expeditions they'd often come across so called "cenotes", a sort of pit/cave filled with groundwater exposed by a hole in the ground (see Wikipedia for details and pictures).
Overambitious adventurers would often overlook the sometimes well-covered holes - and die falling into them.
Urging the conquistadors to caution, the Spanish explorers were told to "watch out for cenotes" (or the Spanish equivalent of it).
Under the influence of British adventurers during the transatlantic triangular trade, that term developed into "notewatching" or "note-watching".
The term remains frequently used today, although usually in a metaphorical way, as it is on our forums.

We on The Range Place generally use the term as a pun.
I alludes to the activity of listening to a singer's output, "watching for (significant) notes".
Discussing those findings is known to potentially cause furious rants and otherwise critical situations, often seriously hurting people's feelings.
We have lost many keen explorers that way.
The double meaning hence - in a rather cynical way - urges not to fall in to the metaphorical pit of hurting yourself or others.

rofl

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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Mon Mar 25, 2013 1:13 am

Monocus wrote:The term is believed to go back to the initial exploration of Mesoamerica - particularly the Yucatán Peninsula - by the Spanish "Conquistadors" from the 15th century to the early 16th century.
During those early expeditions they'd often come across so called "cenotes", a sort of pit/cave filled with groundwater exposed by a hole in the ground (see Wikipedia for details and pictures).
Overambitious adventurers would often overlook the sometimes well-covered holes - and die falling into them.
Urging the conquistadors to caution, the Spanish explorers were told to "watch out for cenotes" (or the Spanish equivalent of it).
Under the influence of British adventurers during the transatlantic triangular trade, that term developed into "notewatching" or "note-watching".
The term remains frequently used today, although usually in a metaphorical way, as it is on our forums.

We on The Range Place generally use the term as a pun.
I alludes to the activity of listening to a singer's output, "watching for (significant) notes".
Discussing those findings is known to potentially cause furious rants and otherwise critical situations, often seriously hurting people's feelings.
We have lost many keen explorers that way.
The double meaning hence - in a rather cynical way - urges not to fall in to the metaphorical pit of hurting yourself or others.

<3
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Mon Mar 25, 2013 8:30 pm

Monocus wrote:The term is believed to go back to the initial exploration of Mesoamerica - particularly the Yucatán Peninsula - by the Spanish "Conquistadors" from the 15th century to the early 16th century.
During those early expeditions they'd often come across so called "cenotes", a sort of pit/cave filled with groundwater exposed by a hole in the ground (see Wikipedia for details and pictures).
Overambitious adventurers would often overlook the sometimes well-covered holes - and die falling into them.
Urging the conquistadors to caution, the Spanish explorers were told to "watch out for cenotes" (or the Spanish equivalent of it).
Under the influence of British adventurers during the transatlantic triangular trade, that term developed into "notewatching" or "note-watching".
The term remains frequently used today, although usually in a metaphorical way, as it is on our forums.

We on The Range Place generally use the term as a pun.
I alludes to the activity of listening to a singer's output, "watching for (significant) notes".
Discussing those findings is known to potentially cause furious rants and otherwise critical situations, often seriously hurting people's feelings.
We have lost many keen explorers that way.
The double meaning hence - in a rather cynical way - urges not to fall in to the metaphorical pit of hurting yourself or others.

Clap
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Re: Rick Astley

Post  Guest on Mon Mar 25, 2013 8:30 pm

Sippe wrote:
Tenor45 wrote:If he's a Baritone, shouldn't his range go down to like at least E4 in highs
That sounds reasonable, let's add notes down to E4 for Mike Patton while we're at it.

rofl
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Re: Rick Astley

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